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one of us carries on. we talked about the acronyms each one of us uses. so, we had a real-world -- a real-live exercise that validated some of the things we talk about this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all o
merced and working between us and the national guard, exercising the evacuation of casualties under the control and observation of the department of emergency management, and these are things that we can only really understand through exercise, through training and then figure out where the gaps are and what we need to do to smooth those out. i'll also reference lan wilder if i can. she said something that was pretty revealing. prior to yesterday and getting out on the beach and seeing us, her thinking was just to ride out the disaster. now she feels like she's in a position where she can do some strategic thinking and strategic planning, which is really an obligation for all of us in charge. as captain jones said earlier this morning, we do not know what this is going to look like and it's certainly not going to look like what we anticipate. but having us understand how to react and how to interact with each other will give us a basis upon which we can go forward and move hopefully very quickly to salvage what we can in the event of a complex catastrophe. thank you. >> and admiral
-day humanitarian assistance disaster relief. we used it as an accreditation not only for some of our adaptive force packages, but more importantly to the state of hawaii to allow them to get an accreditation that they needed for 13 of their hospitals where we set up on ford island, those familiar with the oahu island geography, we utilized ford island and we had a scenario where there was an earthquake with a resultant tsunami and mass casualties along with the destruction that goes with it to the road infrastructure and communication. and, so, we were able to parlay, if you will, this opportunity to leverage off our international partners. we had seven nations that out of the 22 that actually participated in the hadr, and there were probably also 19 of the 22 that at least observed. but there were 7 of us that actually participated. and we were able to share with each other those things that worked, those things that don't work. it's interesting because one of the things that we work very hard on was one of the things that the first panel this morning talked about, and that was communication. and
study if jtap would be feasible for us to use and if it is, it would be fantastic. our concern is if it's only used during a sdas ster and it's not used on a daily basis, are you going to have to spend a lot of time training? it's not really hard to use but there are some complexities with it. so it is a big job in the city tracking patient movement and we are addressing it. and i think we're waiting for the feasibility study to kind of determine what our next step would be. >> i think there was another question here. yes. >> yes, we know from hsda studies that for a very large earthquake you can expect perhaps tens of thousands of individuals that will need hospital treatment and hospitals are generally fairly full anyway. was there any discussion of altered standards of care during your workshops? >> not during the workshop specifically but it is something we've discussed at our hospital council group on and off and it is something the counseling association of hospitals is working on as well. i think we have to think as a group locally what type of policy we would want to have. i
, strike teams from water companies. they simply make a call and tell us we need 10, 12, 15, it's our obligation to put that together and get it to them. they are worried about the incident in their jurisdiction which they have to correct. it's our responsibility to reach bond those borders as their extension to bring in the reserves that they need to maintain that kaupblt newt of operation and then where we function through the state utility operations center and the state operations center to make sure that we have that kind of access and that kind of assistance. we need caltrans, we're going to need chp, we're going to need cal fire, we need dwr, they are invested in restoring their critical infrastructure and it's our responsibility to reach across those lines to get that kind of access to keep that kind of restoration underway. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> in terms of establishing standards for resill yepbs, absolutely, we have done that. again as i mentioned earlier, to get our customers to fund all these capital projects we did up a contract with them. this is what you're gett
humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to b
how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put on and started 3 years ago h
with the maritime services and the coast guard and our reserve forces, i like to think of us as america's or the world's 911 when something bad, either man-made or natural happens, some catastrophe happens in the world, often times the ambassador will pick up the phone and dial 911 and the navy marine corps team answers the phone. it is our those, it is our dna it is our ability to be there. if you look at the communicate dapbt's 3 central tenets of what he believes it importance, readiness is in there. the ability to move and go now. where do you want us, when do you want us, like fedex, we are absolutely guaranteed to be there overnight. it's what we do. it's what we are trained for. and the more we understand and can operate with civic forces, the more we understand what already exists in our life line, the more we can break down political barriers and culture barriers that exist within our own country, the more we can partner and stabilize and support civic operations, because as someone said earlier in the panel, if we need to come in, things are pretty bad. but here's the go
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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